Saturday, October 26, 2013

Writers Write for Oct 26

Added 1050 words to my crime thriller novel, realizing I hadn't finished a chapter that I'd started earlier. So now Part 1 is done, Part 2 is done, Parts 3 and 4 are partway done. Then the POVs come together in Part 5 (only mapped out so far). This project is my keystone project and I've let it sit idle! Don't know what's the matter with me, but I'm gonna attack it soon. Really. Truly. Eat my dust, Lazybutt (yeah, I'm lookin' at you in the mirror). Er, sorry about that interruption of self-talk. Now back to our regularly scheduled program.

Also added about 150 words to some revisions to a horror story a friend of mine and I are writing. Crazy thing, as I read through it this time...I realized that we're actually almost done with the short novella. It'll clock in at about 13k words, so only need about 2 & 1/2 chapters to wrap it up. So that's groovy.

Then another project is about 1500 words from conclusion, a light steampunk MG/YA adventure that another friend and I are writing. We have a friend working on the cover and the mock up looks sweet. As soon as we settle on the final version (and have our ducks in a row), I'll let you take a look.

New words today: 1200
So far this month: 19,500

Now for two more bullet points on reasons to give this writing thing up:
  • You think that writing will make you rich. 
  • You believe that once you sell a book, it's a cakewalk from then on. 
Okay, here's where it gets hard. Konrath's point is that if you're in this gig to make it big, then get another job because the odds are against you. That's true for everything, though, right? Getting it done is hard and for some it won't happen. (That's why people are upset about the 1%'ers, btw. The ones who made it remind us that we didn't. Which is misplaced envy when it comes down to it. We're not mad at the 1%'ers, we're mad that we're lazybutts.) Okay, back to the regularly scheduled program. Again.

I don't have an issue with the second bullet point. I don't believe it's going to be a cakewalk. But I'm still committed to writing in order to get rich - that is, make a living while generating long-term income streams. This is why anyone starts a job or career. That fact alone doesn't disqualify you from pursuing your dreams. It's the lottery mindset that has to go. If you think writing is a ticket to instant wealth, give up writing and do something else. Since I don't believe that, I'm safe...for now.

Any thoughts on what could make you quit writing?
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